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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)
: ...an extraordinary expansion of manhunt missions that have taken out thousands of al qaeda and taliban fighters. >> if you're trying to take down an insurgency, you take away its safe havens, you take away its leaders. >> hit the guy on the road. >> the joint special operations command is almost an industrial- scale counterterrorism killing machine. >> narrator: frontline investigates the latest us strategy... >> bludgeon your opponent. kill and capture as many as you can. make them ask for peace. >> narrator: ...its impact and its risks. >> by launching those attacks, are we creating more militants than in fact we are killing? >> narrator: can this campaign of killing and capturing make the difference? >> it could take years. i mean, i don't think anybody knows. >> bin laden's gone. that creates the kind of space in which diplomacy might actually be able to make progress. >> narrator: tonight on frontline , "kill/capture." >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding i
weapons -- the hopeful plea of the british prime minister to the taliban. is there any chance they will listen? a long march across africa for these somali refugees. they are driven to desperation. >> we have to scale up operations to meet the growing need. >> constantly connected -- is social media leaving all of us overwhelmed? welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. stop fighting, stop bombing, join the political process -- that is what british prime minister david cameron asked a taliban today. even as he spoke those words, four nato soldiers were killed in the eastern part of the country, which begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? the bbc reports. >> british troops in the helmand -- in helmand, dropping into an area the taliban previously controlled. the taliban wisely weren't there to meet them. so far, the british soldiers have not met any opposition. usually, the insurgency retreats, but not always. the villagers hope things will improve without the insurgents around. the taliban steal our food, he says. i am very po
the process will end. sometime in 2014. >> only recently, taliban fighters launched an attack on the prestigious inter- continental hotel in kabul. responsibility for security in the capital had already been transferred to afghans, but neither police nor the army was able to defeat the attackers. helicopters called in to help end the siege after five hours. since the incident, the hotel has become a symbol of evidence in the face of terrorism and is the worst moment for the beginning troop withdrawal from afghanistan. >> the u.s. military and its allies started bombing afghanistan within weeks of the 911 attacks and brought down the taliban regime with air strikes and a massive ground assault within months. the international security assistance force was set up to stabilize the country after the fall of the taliban. we now take a look back at the afghan mission in the past decade. >> their mission was to draw out the taliban and deny al qaeda the most important base. planned to last just a few weeks, the war in afghanistan still goes on a decade later. president george bush ga
, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." the taliban continued to attack nato forces, but one u.s. senator tells us american troops must leave the country even sooner. a long march across africa for these somali refugees. the threat of drought and civil war has driven them to desperation. >> we can scale up our operation to meet the growing need. this crisis could turn into a catastrophe. >> and a royal welcome in one of canada's most remote regions. the duke and duchess of cambridge get a taste of the great outdoors. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and to our viewers across the globe. stop bombing, stop fighting, and joined the political process. that is what the british prime minister, david cameron, asked the taliban today. but even as he spoke those words on the second day of his visit to afghanistan, for nato's silk -- for nato soldiers were killed. which all begs -- which all begs the question, what happens when foreign forces withdraw? >> british troops drop in. it's an area the taliban used to control. no longer. nato is pushing out. that is
forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
of security. killed by 2 gunshot wounds earlier this morning. the taliban has said that they carried out the attack. they have been successful and kandahar at assassinating leaders in the past year. the talibsaan say this is one of their biggest achievements in 10 years of war. i was speaking to a u.s. official who said she was a controversial official. they knew about the allegations of drug dealing. as a result of his death, there are worries about what might happen in kandahar. >> does it change karzai's position of strength? >> he was a key figure in the fight against the taliban. not just for the afghan government. he was in kabul a few weeks ago trying to negotiate the next governor of the province. was not that long ago the american ambassador met with ahmad wali karzai. ahmad wali karzai he was realist, a tough man, a man whose tentacles spread far and wide. she was aware of the threat to him. >> the taliban issued letters to most of the top leaders. if you don't leave kandahar in 5 days, you face death. >> what we have seen from the taliban is a change in tactics. those big atta
was shot and killed in his kandahar home today. a killer a bodyguard who taliban officials say they hired to infiltrate karzai's inner circle. this comes as a blow to the government just days after a visit from u.s. defense secretary leon panetta. we're joined by william cohen. thank you for being with us. >> good to be with you. >> let me ask you about this assassination. some have said this will be a huge propaganda victory for the taliban. do youee? >> anytime they can get that close to the inner circle of president karzai it's a big victory for them. it points out the difficulty that president karzai has had in trying to cope with the local politics as such where all frequently invoking tip o'neill's axiom that all politics is local. we're seeing that all politics are local in afghanistan. that's one of the problems that president karzai has. secondly his brother has a reputation of being a power broker. most of our military leaders have said there's not a military solution in afghanistan it's a political one. it makes it that much more difficult. i think it's going to be more challen
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
host, the taliban, in both pakistan and afghanistan. in pakistan, osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it's too early to tell for certain, initial evidence suggests we have halted the taliban insurgency in the heartland of helmand province. mr. speaker, we are now entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces more training and mentoring. as president obama said in his address last month, the mission is changing from combat to support. when we arrived, there was no one to hand over to, no proper army, no police force. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. mr. speaker, success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure that the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. now, i know there have been well-known problems, especially, with the afghan po
with a friend with a k-47. he was a key power broker in the fight with the taliban. we're live from kabul. it's tuesday, july 12th. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. we start with the deadlock. this afternoon the two sides are farther apart than they've ever been. they were farther apart yesterday when -- then they were even sunday and farther apart sunday then they were thursday. the question is whether the daily meetings are going to continue. the president said he's shooting for the biggest possible deal and asking if not now, when. listen. >> we think it's hard now. imagine how these guys are going to be thinking six months from now in the middle of election season when they are all up. it's not going to get easier, it's going to get harder. we might as well do it now. pull off the band-aid. eat our peas. >> also in the room, eric cantor laid out what was agreed to in the biden talks, which is about $1.5 trillion in cuts, still nearly a trillion dollars short of the amount required to finance a debt deal through 2012. republicans said it needs to be dollar for dollar. the
experience in the south. in the south, there is a lot of open combat. this is the headquarters of the taliban. >> in the east the violence depends on where you are. these to have strong relationships with kabul, with a lot of traffic. today, these are what i call, bombing galleries, where the coalition troops and a large coalition presence is trying very hard to like this town in order to protect this. but every step that they take, they are threatened. thousands every year, that are killing hundreds of native troops, and many times the number of afghans. as we move closer to the border, and you had se, the threat will change. this is not so much ied's because there is less vehicle traffic. the coalition soldiers and the taliban will move on foot. the coalition has helicopters, but then they are back to walking around on foot. this is a lot less useful and they are optimized for -- in places like this you see more small arms fire, lots of snipers. this looks like a street battle in world war two, on a smaller scale. people throwing grenades and things like this. on the coalition side, there i
released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
of the taliban coming back into the political system. ahmed rashid details the negotiatings that have been taking place between the united states and the taliban. for hours and hours the germans were intermediaries. nothing seems to have come of it. why is it proving so difficult to, in some way, bring the taliban into the tent? >> for a couple of things, i'd say about that, without commenting on the specifics of the piece in the "financial times" that you referenced. at the end of the day, this will have to be settled in a political settlement. i think that's clear. why is it hard? there's been a conflict there for a nufb years. the taliban is not an entity where it works at a specific address. you have to get these things to a point where you can have a set of reasonable conversations. what we've said, though, quite clearly and secretary of state said this in her speech earlier this year, the united states is prepared to work with the afghans, with the afghans in the lead to work towards a political settlement here and to bring the parties to the table without precondition. ultimately as the pr
made in the last year and reclaiminghe former taliban ronghold particularly in the south. another major change in the last year is the surge in afghan security forces. there are now 100,000 more afghan security forces than 18 months ago when president obama announced the surge and another 70,000 afghan soldiers and police will be trained and equipped by the end of next summer when all 33,000 u.s. search trips will have withdrwn. in the testimony to congress last week, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mollen characterized the president's decision as, quote, more aggressive and incurring more risk than mcraven had initially recommended. however, admiral mullen felt, could come only the president and the end can really determine the acceptable level of risk we must take because as he put it, quote, the truth is we would have run other kind of risks by keeping more forces in afghanistan onger. and among the other risks for the risks of perpetuating the greater afgh dependent on the forces and inhibiting the growth and keep the devotee and confidence on the part of the afgha
, taliban and others got strength and found terrorist center and now we're involved in a war that involves the future of the world, not just peace for the world, but american peace as well. indeed, i would be very caution as we go about -- cautious as we go about suggesting that we automatically walk away from the commander in chief's plan. indeed if we are not careful, the vacuum will catch up with us and america will find itself in a much broader and a much more intense struggle. with that i yield back the balance of my time. >> would the gentleman yield? the chair: the gentleman yields back? for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. cohen: thank you. before i yield to my colleague from california to respond, i would like to mention, i appreciated mr. lewis' history, but i would suggest to you that al qaeda could have found a base in yemen, they could have found a base in the sudan, they could have found a base in other places. there was nothing particularly unique about afghani
taliban stronghold particularly in the south. another major change in the last year is the surge in afghan security forces. there are now 100,000 more afghan security forces than 18 months ago when president obama announced the surge and another 70,000 afghan soldiers and police will be trained and equipped by the end of next summer when all 33,000 u.s. search trips will have withdrawn. in the testimony to congress last week, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mollen characterized the president's decision as, quote, more aggressive and incurring more risk than mcraven had initially recommended. however, admiral mullen felt, could come only the president and the end can really determine the acceptable level of risk we must take because as he put it, quote, the truth is we would have run other kind of risks by keeping more forces in afghanistan longer. and among the other risks for the risks of perpetuating the greater afghan dependent on the forces and inhibiting the growth and keep the devotee and confidence on the part of the afghan forces. the committee will be interested
compound. it's the third taliban attack on an afghan powerbroker in the south in more than two weeks. the new u.s. ambassador to afghanistan ryan crocker said it's proof the taliban is so damaged, it can't carry out large-scale operations. he spoke today in kabul. >> they've had to kind of regroup and figure out what they can do and, in some cases, that has been assassination. we saw a very similar pattern in iraq. clearly, these are horrific attacks but they can also be interpreted as a sign of significant organizational weakness. >> sreenivasan: a taliban spokesman told the associated press the kandahar mayor was targeted for ordering the destruction of homes city officials claimed were illegally constructed. two children were killed during that demolition. the prime minister of norway today announced an independent commission will review how last week's twin attacks were allowed to happen. and more details emerged about the self-confessed killer, who is in police custody. we have a report from carl dinnen of "independent television news." >> reporter: by the side of the lake, a sh
rocket projectile, that results in the american troops and have given long-range rockets to taliban in afghanistan and increasing the insurgents' ability to hit u.s. and coalition positions from a safer position." in june, 14 u.s. service members were killed in combat in iraq and officials attribute the death to militias trained by the iran revolutionary guard. senator, what do we do about iran? >> well, i think people need to understand why iran is doing this. the biggest nightmare for the ayatollah in iran is to have a democracy in iraq and afghanistan on their borders. so, yes, they are helping the taliban and trying to react to bring down the iraqi democracy and trying to undermine the efforts here. they're responsible for material coming in both countrys killing not only the american soldiers but the iraqi and afghan people. they are helping assad in syria. i hope people understand what iran is up to. their biggest nightmare is that the arab spring is successful, that we can pull off iraq and afghanistan in terms of representative democracy. they are going to fight to the bitte
against the taliban. the bomb may have been targeted at the elite, but the brunt was borne by afghans. others die from nato airstrikes. six villagers died in this raid, to flush out insurgents. among the victims, women and children. it has led to a wave of anger. protests have taken place, pressing for the withdrawal of western forces. some are wondering, at what cost? starting next week, thousands of troops begin a withdrawal from afghanistan. questions have been raised about if they can take on the role. bbc news. >> austerity is a word many europeans have had to adopt, although this sparked massive protests. italy's senate passed their own cost-cutting package after investors began worrying the eurozone's third largest economy would be sucked in. this goes to parlaiment on friday. >> italian senators know their country may be drawn into a crisis effecting the eurozone. so they debated the plan to reduce the debt the country has accumulated. italy owes 1.6 trillion euros, the most indebted country in europe, with more outstanding bonds than greece, ireland, and portugal together. in
. >> reporter: what we've learned is that the taliban is taking responsibility for the killing of ahmed wali karzai, a very controversial figure in afghanistan, alleged to have tie to the opium trade, alleged to have been on the payroll of the cia, and he is alleged to have ties to numerous other elicit activities. >> he's actually, i think some people would certainly get the impression anyway that he was a guy who played all sides off against the middle, the cia, the world of drugs, in which he was deeply involved in the taliban themselves, so why did they kill him now, do we know? >> so far they have not, why they would kill him, although they called it one of their greate greatest victories in a decade long war against the u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan. why they would want to kill somebody allegedly involved in the opium trade remains to be seen. however, having played all sides he's certain to have made a number of enemies over the years. charles? >> what do we know about the circumstances in which he was killed? >> he was killed -- homes -- i guess one of his guards shot him and h
, it is worth reading that they destroy the taliban camps sending al qaeda running in just a few of them with a few calgary course charges and it is quite a story. but the united nations says nato took over the afghanistan campaign. and there we find another find of the coffee out. it turns out -- caveat. it turns out some allies simply do not wish to make more where there were no shooting battles. some did it one to fight unless they have helicopters there were all of these rules than pretty soon we started to see the folks who wanted to send soldiers out to the field to have almost insulting checklist so this starts to develop in buy the way i am very careful when a make a statement about the caveat because i don't mean in any way to cut down on the bravery of the troops who are helping us americans out there. and the germans are not very willing to fight because of a historical precedent. it is very difficult for the germans to get over second world war history. please don't and feud any other motive into that. so now you have a copy ought with afghanistan where we're not prepared to
. there are currently more than 150,000 forces in afghanistan, including 100,000 american soldiers. it comes as taliban says it killed a key adviser to president hamid karzai as well as a member of parliament in kabul this weekend. this just one week after karzai's half brother was gunned down by a member of his own security team. the taliban also took responsibility for that assassination. nato also says an explosion killed three service members in eastern afghanistan. this morning. >>> still ahead today on "way too early," if you still have a knot in your stomach from yesterday's world cup finals match between u.s. and japan, you're certainly not the only one. we'll show you the full heart-breaking highlights if you missed them ahead in sports. >>> plus, what happens when you combine an outdoor blues con certified with 60-mile-an-hour winds? a stage collapse in ottawa. this was insane. it sent concert goers and the band running for their lives. it's all coming up with "way too early." about nine hours later mary jo's body was found in kennedy's car in the water off a bridge and the car pulled out of
rough. the coalition troops and the taliban moved on foot. the coalition also has helicopters that can get them between mountain tops. they would be back to walking around on foot. these are law that useful. -- a lot less useful. they are used for blowing up vehicles. in some places, you see more small arms. this sort of looks like a world war ii street battle on a smaller scale. guys running around with rifles and tossing grenades, things like that. on the coalition side, there is a significant air power aspect of it as well. the tactical security threats to nato troops. >> this is located in the far most peace which is a ride along the border. this is a critical area for cross border infiltration as well as a historic avenue and the movement of supplies. >> in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how would you characterize this? >> i would characterize this as high as venture. there is a significant influx of insurgent fighters to the area. >> we are prepared to go on a mission, tell me about that and what it is for. >> this is a standard reconnaissance mission. we're going in there to
making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got from the compound including names of different key al qaeda leaders. he says this is the time to actually end the war with al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happen
of them detonated the explosives. police are believed to have killed the remaining three. the taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which was the deadliest to hit southern afghanistan in six months. nato has declared two crossings on cozumel -- kosovo's border with syria restricted areas, and peacekeepers have been checking cars for weapons. the move comes after ethnic serbs on wednesday attacked and set fire to a border post and fired at nato troops. the european union urged both sides to restore calm. while western europe is still waiting for summer, russia is sweltering under heat wave. russians are battling to prevent a repeat of last year's wildfires in which dozens of people lost their lives. >> the view from a fire fighting plane is disturbing. in southern russia, but also in the northwest and far east, foreign buyers are waiting, and peat bogs are smoldering. -- foreign fires are waging. they are ill-equipped to tackle the blazes. >> the heat and wind are a problem. we will keep at it as long as it takes. >> at least 7000 people -- experts and volunteers -- have been
by taliban and other militants in the southern eastern parts of the country to focus more on high profile attacks. we saw this yesterday with the killing, the gunning down of a top karzai adviser, and also last week with the killing of the afghan president's half brother. all of this comes at a time of great transition, and it also sends a message of who really is safe here in afghanistan. randi? >> thank you very much. appreciate that. >>> time, 46 minutes past the hour. a cnn in depth story, the phone hacking scandal in papers owned by murdoch. and then the country's top police official, paul stevenson, resigned over the weekend. that's him right there. the assistant commissioner followed suit today. >>> in italy, a judge today dismissed all defense motions in the trial of prime minister berlusconi. he is accused of having sex with a minor, and is charged with abuse of power. he denies the charges and the next hearing date is in october. >>> the kick that brought all of joy to japan. the amazing victory in the united states in the finals of the women's word cup, and saying they were pla
and discussed security with hamid karzai. the taliban has continued attacks during the transition phase as control passes from nato troops to afghan forces. >> the hacker group anonymous has targeted the colombian president and one of british murdoch's papers. they say they have broken into servers belonging to nato and have got their hands on restricted material. they said that they were sitting on a gigabyte of data stolen from the military alliance. on wednesday, authorities in the u.s. and europe arrested 21 alleged members of the anonymous. nato has called the group a threat to governments and the people. for anyone out there who has criticized their employer, there is some good news. the european court of justice has ruled in favor of a nurse who complain about the care of a nursing home she worked at and was fired up -- was fired forward. >> she lost her job as a jury after connors after bringing a criminal complaint against her employers. -- she lost her job as a nurse for the elderly. the european court of human rights has ruled the dismissal on fair and infringe upon the right
secured the area. among the dead, an influential cleric. a man opposed to the taliban. like so many other tax, the brunt of it was borne by ordinary afghans. more people are also dying from nato air strikes. late on wednesday, six villages were attacked among the victims, women and children. it led to a wave of anger. protests have taken place pressing for the withdrawal of western forces. that is about to happen imminently. some are wondering, at what cost? starting next week and over the next several months, thousands of nato troops have begun to a withdrawal. handing over security to local afghan forces. questions are being raised about whether there are taking on the role especially after these high-profile killings. >> now, austerity is a word and a condition many europeans have been forced to adopt all though it is sparking massive protests across the continent. italy's senate passed its own cost-cutting package coming after investors started to worry that the eurozone could be the largest economy to be sucked into the debt crisis. our europe panter reports. italy has been told that
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 106 (some duplicates have been removed)

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